Trevor

a blog so you can keep with him

Cultivating Voice – Written Reflections, Week 3

To help encourage conversation, and the habit of writing, my course on tutoring in the Writing Center has weekly reflections to share every week. I realized that this might be something worth sharing on this blog: it relays my experiences and thoughts about events in my life, which I suppose is the focus of this blog currently.

This isn’t due until next Monday (we meet weekly for two hours), but I’ll try to get this up while the class is still fresh on my mind. A note: this is a draft for the course, and will be addressing its audience as such. This week I’m trying something very different, in that I haven’t done this sort of writing exercise before. I think it mixes dialogue and editing, writer and audience. I’m happy with where this exercise is going, and I’m planning on trying it for other pieces.

This discussion was very exciting for me! I feel that the Writing Grid helps lay out much of the material I encounter, or try to encounter, by, oddly, giving my a system to encounter it.

Okay, let’s make that a little more coherent: I read and write. You probably do to, hence your interest in this course. What I found that the Writing Grid helped with was… was…

Well, wait. Let’s move this around some: The Writing Grid was helpful to me. As a person who’s interested in reading and writing, gaining a methodology to utilize with respect to my literary praxis allows me to concurrently construct and dismantle the literature and propaganda around me.

That got too fancy-dancy toward the end there: “The Writing Grid was helpful to me. As a person who’s interested in reading and writing, it was nice to see a method of composition that I could use explained. I find it useful to both practices, after all, reading and writing are heavily intertwined and I think it’s important to have one thing for both.” But I don’t know if that leads me too far astray of my original ideas… well, I should change that, because this is more important to me.

Revision (I think you’re getting the hint of where I’m taking this, but it’s an interesting exercise for me): “Reading and writing are intertwined. Both are necessary I was interested, then, in how our Writing Grid applies to both of them so well. It’s important to have a developed methodology that works for both practices, for they are integral to each other. Chris Mann likes to say “A writer is just an impatient reader”, and this kept arriving in my mind for this today. After all Writing and reading are reflexive acts, forever turing in on themselves, and gi giving way to deeper readings, and stronger compositions.” This is getting closer to my outlined goals, I think. OUTLINE: It asserts the necessity of reading/writing, and ties it into the Writing Grid. From there, I go on to defend my tougher conjecture here: that one method is necessary to describe both reading and writing, because it helps draw the strengths of both out. (I’m trying this “recursive outlining” (making an outline of an already-drafted work) exercise for the first time in my writing process along with this larger exercise).

New draft, I’m gonna copy/paste and just set to work on editing: “Reading and writing are intertwined. I was interested, then, in how our Writing Grid applies to both of them so well. It’s important to have a developed methodology that works for both practices, for they are integral to each other. Chris Mann, a poet I enjoy, likes to say “A writer is just an impatient reader”; this kept arriving in my mind today. Writing and reading are reflexive acts, forever turning in on themselves, giving way to deeper readings and stronger compositions. A single methodology, like the Writing Grid that ties both together, can help with this deepening of practice.” I shored up the ending, because I didn’t feel it was conclusive. Beyond that, I fixed a typo, some punctuation, and deleted the previous cuts. I think I have an intro paragraph that I’m willing to share!

Reading and writing are intertwined. I was interested, then, in how our Writing Grid applies to both of them so well. It’s important to have a developed methodology that works for both practices, for they are integral to each other. Chris Mann, a poet I enjoy, likes to say “A writer is just an impatient reader”; this kept arriving in my mind today. Writing and reading are reflexive acts, forever turning in on themselves, giving way to deeper readings and stronger compositions. A single methodology, like the Writing Grid that ties both together, can help with this deepening of practice.

REFLECTIONS ON THIS EXERCISE: This is interesting, and I’m glad I accidentally came to try this out. In case it was confusing, here’s my definition for my new “Draft Monologue” exercise: “Incorporate a narrator into your drafting process. Rather than dealing with the same block of text again and again, outline your reactions to it, and reshape it in a dialogue with yourself, using common writing techniques and following your usual writing process.”

(I swear that I think I came up with it myself (not plagiarizing), though I hope I’m not the first to have done it, if that makes any sense)

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2 Responses

  1. passy says:

    hey it’s passy i just got an account here but i can’t seem to friend you or find you or whatever unless i click the link that’s in your sig.

    i’m shangrilamornings here. can you help me out?

    <3passy

  2. carfossil says:

    I googled, you’re on Blogger. This is WordPress. The difference is somehow crucial, I guess.

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